Biobased plastics

Vincot newest certification for bioplastics : OK biobased

Vinçotte announces proudly the first OK biobased certificates of a whole range of raw materials. The first licensee holders are each located in a different continent: Asia, America and Europe. List of certified products >>

RENEWABLE RESOURCES

As active drivers for sustainable development, multiple companies are proactively searching for alternatives to fossil-based raw materials. Several manufacturers are making synthetic materials using as their base starch, cellulose, lactic acid, “bacterial fat”, etc. By so doing, these companies contribute in an innovative manner to resolving the economic and environmental problem of fossil fuels and greenhouse gases.

 OK biobased – NEW AS OF SEPTEMBER 2009!

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As a result of the increased environmental awareness among customers, there is a growing market for products on a basis of renewable raw materials. And that environmentally conscious motivation on the part of customers is exactly the reason why there is a need for an independent, high-quality guarantee of the renewability of raw materials. The “OK biobased” certification meets that need perfectly.

In contrast to LCA (Life Cycle Assessment), the investigation method behind the OK biobased certification is very simple and the exact value can be precisely and scientifically measured and calculated. This renders checks and re-checks very transparent and also allows “apples to be compared with apples” with the greatest ease.

On a basis of the determined percentage of renewable raw materials (% Bio-based), your product can be certified as one-star-bio-based, two-star-bio-based, three-star-bio-based or four-star-bio-based.

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1 star stands for 20-40% biobased; 2 stars stand for 40-60% biobased; 3 stars stand for 60-80% biobased; 4 stars stand for more than 80% biobased

For Frequently Asked Questions about biobased certification, please visit the website of Vincot

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Wednesday, July 14th, 2010 Biobased plastics, Blister News No Comments

Biotechnology could cut C02 sharply, help build green economy

Industrial biotechnology has the potential to save the planet up to 2.5 billion tons of CO2 emissions per year and support building a sustainable future, a WWF report found.

WMF Bioplastics
As the world is debating how to cut dangerous emissions and come together in an international agreement treaty which will help protect the planet from potentially devastating effects of climate change, innovative ideas how to reduce our CO2 are very valuable.
A recent report published by WWF Denmark identifies the potential to be between 1 billion and 2.5 billion tons CO2 per year by 2030, more than Germany’s total reported emissions in 1990.

Industrial biotechnology could help create a true 21st century green economy, the report states. Industrial biotechnology applications are already widely used in everyday life. They help reduce the amount of time needed to bake fresh bread, increase the yield in wine, cheese and vegetable oil production and save heat in laundry washing.

“Low carbon biotech solutions are a good example of hidden or invisible climate solutions that are all around us already today but are easy to overlook for policymakers, investors and companies.” says John Kornerup Bang, Head of Globalization Program at WWF Denmark and coauthor of the report.

A newer example on how biotechnology solutions could help reduce carbon emissions is the harvesting of biogas from waste digesters and wastewater streams.

The report emphasizes the potential of taking that existing technology even one step further and creating fully closed loop systems.

Biorefineries are able to transform any biobased waste material into a valuable feedstock for the production of other biobased materials. The possible emission reductions for such processes are estimated to be as high as 633 million tons of CO2.

The report indentifies four fundamental dimensions of industrial biotechnology: Improved efficiency, the substitution of fossil fuels, the substitution of oil-based materials and the creation of a closed loop system with the potential to eliminate waste.

But as with most technologies, the potential to achieve sustainability objectives does not automatically translate into such goals be­ing realized.

“Politicians need to set the path toward a green economy. This will not be easy, and we must look for new solutions, which can help us reduce emissions very quickly. It is clear that there is no alternative to explore these inno­vative pathways,” John Kornerup Bang said.

Downloads: Biotech Technical Report Biotech Policy Report

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Friday, July 9th, 2010 Biobased plastics, Blister News No Comments